Plan key to secure exports

SA cattle producers are being encouraged to have an on-farm biosecurity plan in place before June 30 to maximise their trading opportunities.

CHECK-UP: Producers are advised to purchase cattle from properties involved in an assurance program and ensure they see a health declaration.

CHECK-UP: Producers are advised to purchase cattle from properties involved in an assurance program and ensure they see a health declaration.

Next month, the new national framework for bovine johnes disease comes into effect.

Infected BJD properties will no longer be quarantined and these cattle will be able to be traded online and in markets.

It will be up to buyers to minimise their risk of introducing BJD to their property by demanding a national cattle health declaration each time they buy cattle and use the BJD Biosecurity Checklist.

Producers are also advised to consider using the Johnes Beef Assurance Score or Dairy ManaJD schemes for a higher level of assurance.

Those properties that opt to do nothing will be classified J-BAS Level 0.

SA cattle properties have three options to maintain a higher score:

Former Market Assurance Program properties can transition to J-BAS Level 8

Producers must maintain their veterinary-reviewed biosecurity plan and undertake a check test at least every three years. SA herds wanting to trade with WA require J-BAS 8 or dairy score 8 plus additional testing.

Transition to J-BAS Level 7

This requires the producer to have a veterinary-reviewed biosecurity plan in place by June 30 and a check test undertaken by June 30, 2018. Any producers who are not in the MAP program but wish to eventually attain a J-BAS Level 8 score should undertake a sample test not a check test prior to June 30, 2018. This will count as the first of two sample tests (two years apart) required to meet the J-BAS Level 8 requirements. 

Transition to J-BAS Level 6

This requires the producer to have a biosecurity plan in place by June 30 but does not need to be endorsed by a veterinarian. Websites such as farmbiosecurity.com.au provide guidelines for producers to design their own plan. Trade with NT requires a minimum J-BAS 6.

In all three options, there must be no infection or suspicion of BJD in the herd. Producers must investigate and resolve any suspect cases that arise.

  • Based on information supplied by PIRSA.