Focus on wool and sheep at Jamestown Show

BLADE: Warooka's John Dalla, pictured shearing, earlier used a blade to provide wool which was spun and knitted into a garment by the end of the day.

BLADE: Warooka's John Dalla, pictured shearing, earlier used a blade to provide wool which was spun and knitted into a garment by the end of the day.

The Jamestown Show continued its traditional emphasis on wool and sheep with stunning results on Sunday and Monday.

The $4000 Heiniger Northern Ram of the Year was judged, with the honours going to Collinsville, Burra, and the Ewe of the Year and Pair of the Year were also decided.

One of the rams at the show was sold for $28,000.

To add to the excitement, Australian Wool Innovation Ambassador and host of television show Getaway Catriona Rowntree hosted the wool-themed fashion parade in the Big Shed on both days.

She opened the show which had a two-day format for the first time since the 1930s.

Show president David Cooper said organisers had only stopped the two-day event because of the Depression.

“The Depression is long ago now and they thought they would ramp things up to provide a link between the Jamestown Races on Saturday and the show on Sunday and Monday,” he said. 

“The format has been a huge success and will definitely continue.”

The crowd reached 2000 on the Sunday and hit 6000 on Monday.

On the first day, a goods and services auction took place, a band performed and there were fireworks.

The speed-shear was a prime attraction as was the hogget competition earlier in the day.

Exhibitors waited with baited breath to see whether they had succeeded in the Stacey Pavilion where categories included cooking, produce, fruit and vegetables, metalcraft and artwork.

The poultry competition attracted 460 birds, an increase on last year, and the cattle had 70 entries and sheep 90.

The AWI Fashion Parade was held on both days with Ms Rowntree, wife of a Victorian woolgrower, compering the event in fine style.

“This was beyond my wildest dreams,” she said, running her fingers through a fleece. “I cannot believe the number of young people involved.

“I am seeing all the industry ... whether it is shearing right through to woolgrowing.

“This town is at the peak of its powers."