Rare western quoll found

The surprise find of a rare western quoll at Arkaba, Flinders Ranges, marks a new stage of conservation effort.

The surprise find of a rare western quoll at Arkaba, Flinders Ranges, marks a new stage of conservation effort.

A healthy 608-gram male western quoll was found in late 2017 at Wild Bush Luxury’s Arkaba Conservancy in the Flinders Ranges, to the surprise and delight of the conservation team that was checking a trap set for feral cats.

This surprise rare find, marks a new stage of the conservation effort of this near endangered, native marsupial, with more emphasis being put on those in the private sector to continue an important western quoll re-introduction program says Arkaba general manager Brendon Bevan.

“The large-scale re-introduction program is a really important initiative and we wanted to do our part at Arkaba to encourage quoll numbers throughout the Flinders Ranges,” he said.

“We have been incredibly proactive at Arkaba in working towards the eradication of feral predators, such as cats and foxes, to allow native species such as quolls to re-emerge and this is exciting evidence that quolls are surviving, right here on our property.”

The main program, which was introduced in 2014 by the Foundation for Australia’s Most Endangered Species (FAME) and the South Australian Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources (DEWNR), aimed to re-introduce the western quoll to South Australia, where they have been extinct for over 100 years.

This particular quoll is the first found on Arkaba’s 60,000 acre property.

It is hopefully the initial step to a repopulation of this important native predator outside of a national park that will help to restore the natural eco-system.