Trucks roll into Mid North

TRUCKERS: Members of the Historic Commercial Vehicle Club of Australia gather with an old truck outside the Narridy Hall during the South Australian branch's visit to the Mid North.
TRUCKERS: Members of the Historic Commercial Vehicle Club of Australia gather with an old truck outside the Narridy Hall during the South Australian branch's visit to the Mid North.

Old truckers rolled into Port Broughton and district on their second run for the year.

YESTERYEAR: An impressive display of old rigs was assembled beside the grain bins at the farm of motor enthusiast Ivan Venning.

YESTERYEAR: An impressive display of old rigs was assembled beside the grain bins at the farm of motor enthusiast Ivan Venning.

The Historic Commercial Vehicle Club of Australia’s South Australian branch had 52 entries for the run.

The hosts from June 29 to July 1 were Kelvin and Pam Stringer, Graham and Dianne Correll and Bruce and Helen Philby.

On Friday night at the Port Broughton Tourist Park, the information packs were handed out as this was the main base for the group.

Spencer Gulf buses were couriers for the weekend in transporting people to their evening venues.

Early on Saturday morning the trucks lined up for the 110km run through to Wandearah, via Crystal Brook, all in the rain and cold weather.

They drove to Narridy to see John Slattery’s agricultural historical machinery collection, restored and in working condition.

Next stop was to visit Margaret Ramke who demonstrated her industrial sewing machine in manufacturing and repairs of vinyl, canvas. It makes truck roll tarps and does carpet overlocking. The running board lunch was prepared by the Crystal Brook Hockey Club at the Narridy Hall.

The group was entertained without music by Helen and Bruce giving a demonstration of dancing on the beautiful floorboards.

Climbing back into their vehicles and trucks, the group went to Ivan Venning’s sheds at Crystal Brook.

There was a quick look at Clements Gap where the Americans took over the school for their mess area and set up a base back in 1942 in World War II.

Port Broughton Golf Club catered for the group with a two-course meal for Saturday evening. 

Sunday morning was still cold, but the sun was out as they drove to Fisherman’s Bay to hear about the history of the bay from the early 1920s.

They returned to Port Broughton then went to Mundoora for the markets.

Ivan Arbon demonstrated his own invention of a bin hitch from Hitches ‘n’  More.

Dinner was at the Mundoora Community Sports Club.

The convoy travelled to Kelvin and Pam Stringer’s farm to see his Deutz collection of tractors, trucks, stationary engines and some cars.

A pizza tea was a special treat from the Port Broughton Hotel. 

Everyone enjoyed the weekend, but it was cold.

Hours of painstaking restoration has been put into the trucks and vehicles that took part in the convoy.

The cavalcade include White trucks from yesteryear.

Meanwhile, the Pirie and Districts Automotive Restorers Club recently visited the Australian Loadmaster Trailers factory at Georgetown. The factory also builds outdoor furniture.

Club members took photographs of their visit for inclusion in their latest newsletter.

The featured car on the front of the newsletter was a five-litre V8 Holden Torana.

Comments