King of the mount returns, bigger and better

KING OF THE MOUNTAIN: Experienced runner John Csongei made short work of the course, crossing the finish line in just over 42 minutes in 2017.
KING OF THE MOUNTAIN: Experienced runner John Csongei made short work of the course, crossing the finish line in just over 42 minutes in 2017.

King of the Mount is back and so are nearly 70 eager runners who will be taking on the 14 kilometre event or the newly introduced Sea to Summit, 42 kilometre event this weekend.

The event has been given a new breath of life from In The Flinders, who picked up the popular trail running event after it lost traction almost thirty years ago. 

As 2017 proving to be such a success, the team have introduced a new event to the day, the Sea to Summit which will start in the waters of the Spencer Gulf and take runners all the way to Melrose.  

Quinten Vanderwerf, the manager of nature based tour operator, In The Flinders says that after receiving feedback from last year, they have created a new event and hope to provide a good challenge to all competitors. 

“It is pretty grueling. You have over 1.4 kilometres of elevation to do and it will definitely be a tough event”, Mr Vanderwerf said. 

“It is quite a good challenge. A lot of people want to get into trail running but are not sure about the next step or aren’t sure about how to get into it and their confidence levels are not that high.”

“An event like this where the course is properly marked, there are aid stations, first aid and others on the course with you it makes it a lot easier to dip your toes into the water. The mental and physical health benefits are pretty huge and we want to use it as a way to showcase our region.”

Runners should expect a very rocky trail, especially considering it is the Flinders Ranges. It is expected that for the 14 kilometre loop, competitors will take two to three hours, and several more for the sea to summit. 

“The Mount Remarkable trail has some quite rocky slopes that people have to cross. it is mostly single trail. The sea to summit does make use of some fire trail as well as some nicely layered single trail. It is probably a rocky and technical course.”

The 42 kilometre event will take competitors from the waters of the Spencer Gulf, across some private property, under the Augusta Highway, into Mambray Creek, across the ranges, over the top of Mount Remarkable and down into Melrose. 

Mr Vanderwerf says this year’s numbers are down but this has been found to be quite similar for many events across the region. 

Registrations for the event close Friday August 17 at 5pm. There are limited numbers available for the sea to summit distance and it is almost sold out. 

The event will be rubbish free so organisers are urging competitors to bring their own water bottles and they will be able to refill them along the course.