Grain industry ready for bold future in Mid North

GUESTS: At the grain research update were Larn McMurray, left; Andrew Ware, of Port Lincoln; Clare consultant Allan Mayfield; Jack Desbiolles; and Port Germein grower and consultant Barry Mudge.
GUESTS: At the grain research update were Larn McMurray, left; Andrew Ware, of Port Lincoln; Clare consultant Allan Mayfield; Jack Desbiolles; and Port Germein grower and consultant Barry Mudge.

The Mid North grain industry is preparing for the cropping season while armed with the latest research findings, new knowledge and critical advice.

Information to support the state's growers has been delivered at Grains Research and Development Corporation grains research updates.

Corporation grower relations manager - south Courtney Ramsey says the state's premier grains research, development and extension forum, the Adelaide update, had played an important role in equipping growers and advisers for the coming season.

"New findings and recommendations from the corporation investments in research and development will inform growers' decision-making - not only in the coming production year but well beyond," she said.

With its mix of forward-thinking advisers, growers and key industry representatives, the update provides a crucial opportunity for networking, sharing and debating ideas, access to researchers and an ability to provide direct feedback to inform future investment.

"At the two-day event, expert speakers from around the nation discussed future industry challenges and opportunities, along with more immediate, regional agronomic and tactical approaches - underpinned by outcomes from rigorous scientific research," she said.

Key messages delivered to growers and advisers attending the event included:

  • The grain industry is poised to benefit from domestic market opportunities in eastern states;
  • Global trends will require the industry to target unique opportunities to ensure it remains competitive in international markets;
  • The southern grain industry will continue to deal with a climate that varies year to year and has a warming and, most likely, a drying trend;
  • Research shows that highest yields for winter wheat comes from April establishment;
  • Sound, evidence-based science is reinforcing that snail baiting efficacy is higher earlier in the season than in spring;
  • Rotating pre-emergent herbicide modes of action and using other weed management practices will be essential to managing resistance in weeds to new herbicides.

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