Rock and roll hits the Ranges

COMMUNITY: Organiser John Simpson with Sally Brown from Emily's Bistro, one of the many businesses set to benefit from the tourism boost.
COMMUNITY: Organiser John Simpson with Sally Brown from Emily's Bistro, one of the many businesses set to benefit from the tourism boost.

Quorn locals are getting ready to Rock the Ranges as preparations for the town's first live rock performance get underway.

The outback railway town is no stranger to live music, but rock-and-roll is a welcome change to its country roots.

Organiser John Simpson said the idea has grown into a fully fledged ticketed event.

"Quorn being my home town, I wanted to put an event on and everyone has been saying they get a lot of country music, can they get something different. So I though 'Yep lets do a rock show'," he said.

"I made a few inquiries, sent a Facebook message to the Zep Boys page and they replied within about 10 minutes Now here we are, it all just happened."

Headlining the show is Led Zeppelin cover band the Zep Boys, along with some other great South Aussie bands; Hooligans, The Cut Snakes and Critical Limit.

Rock the Ranges is scheduled to be held in late October, but coronavirus restrictions have threatened its viability.

"We didn't know for a long time if we could still run it and It was only a couple of weeks ago when the government lifted restrictions that we got the go ahead," Mr Simpson said.

"We will still have to be careful, but at least we can all get out and enjoy ourselves.

"All the farmers around here were doing it tough with the drought ... then they got hit with the whole covid thing its been hard for everyone so it will be a real morale boost."

Mr Simpson also organises 500 Miles of Music - a travelling concert inspired by the Big Red Bash.

Like his other events, Rock the Ranges features and element of charity as $5 from every ticket will be donated to the Royal Flying Doctor Service.

"I always like to include a charity if I can just to help out. It's nice to make some money, but I don't need the money, the whole thing is a heap of fun for me to do," Mr Simpson said.

"They are always looking for funds and they were all too happy. We got the official tick of approval to fundraiser with them and every little bit helps."

If the event goes well it could become a permanent fixture on the Quorn calendar.

"We hope everyone turns up and has a good time because we want to make it an annual thing," Mr Simpson said.

"It might even turn into a two day event after awhile so people spend more time up here.

"The whole intention is to get people to spend more time up here and if we put things on that will happen."

This story Rock and roll hits the Ranges first appeared on The Transcontinental.