Campaign encourages fish options

NOT A BORE: Fresh Fish Place assistant manager Kelly Pearson with a trawler-caught boarfish which she described as a versatile species.
NOT A BORE: Fresh Fish Place assistant manager Kelly Pearson with a trawler-caught boarfish which she described as a versatile species.


Seafood lovers across South Australia are being encouraged to consider getting a taste for other fish species to substitute for more popular species as part of a new campaign.

The state government has launched the 'Same Dish, New Fish' campaign which highlights the abundance of seafood choices in South Australia and how various species can be used in dishes.

Minister for Primary Industries and Regional Development Tim Whetstone said seafood consumers had gravitated to familiar species like King George whiting, southern garfish, snapper and blue swimmer crab and while these species were in demand, things were changing.

"As fisheries are managed in a sustainable way in this state, these species are not always available, or may be more expensive," he said.

"We have a number of new artisan species increasingly becoming available we want seafood consumers to be on the lookout for."

Fresh Fish Place manager Craig McCathie was supportive of people considering other fish species and said it was not suprising this was being promoted.

"Popular South Australian fish species have been firming in price every year, coupled with seasonality some species like (King George) whiting and calamari are hitting record prices every summer for the past several years," he said.

The campaign has shown a spotlight on a number of different seafood options, including mulloway, sand crabs, salmon trout and octopus.

Kelly Pearson with some crumbed yellowfin whiting fillets

Kelly Pearson with some crumbed yellowfin whiting fillets

Mr McCathie said sand crabs were utilised in the store when blue crabs were off-season and felt they had a touch sweeter meat because they came from colder waters while there were three types of octopus supplied in the region.

Other species Mr McCathie recommended included yellowfin whiting, which he said was delicious and great value, as well as morwong and red gurnard which he believed was a good substitute for snapper.

He said there were reasons many fish species were "underutilised", including discolouration or change in texture when frozen, but they were still good eating when cooked.

"Some fish discolour even in the freezer, but they are still fine tasting and cook-up fine," he said.

SA Food and Wine Ambassador Callum Hann said he believed the Same Dish, New Fish campaign was a great way to show how people could substitute various fish species so they could discover and enjoy the wide variety of local seafood.

"I think we have an untapped foodie heaven right here in our local waters and it is great and practical way to show people just what they are missing out on," he said.

"Some of the state's best kept seafood secrets are about to be revealed to all."

This story Plenty of fish options first appeared on Port Lincoln Times.